ChatLab
Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania

Lab Personnel

Lab Director | Staff | Post-Doctoral Fellows | Student Researchers | Visiting Researchers | Alumni

Chatterjee Lab 2014

The Chatterjee Lab, April 2014 (photo taken by Jonathan Yu)

Lab Director
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Anjan Chatterjee
M.D., F.A.A.N.

Anjan Chatterjee

Professor of Neurology
Department of Neurology
Contact: anjan@mail.med.upenn.edu

My area of interest is in Cognitive Neuroscience and Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology. My research is directed at understanding the architecture and neural bases for human cognition. The structure of cognition is at present (and perhaps in principle) not reduced easily to cellular or molecular explanations. The study of how the brain mediates cognition, while constrained by micro-neural facts, is more directly investigated at higher levels of organization by studying cognition in humans. We use experimental and neuroimaging techniques in normal subjects and examine the neuro-psychological effects of brain damage. A clear understanding of cognitive systems and their breakdown is essential in educating patients and families and critical in designing rational treatment strategies.

Staff
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Eileen Cardillo
D. Phil.

Eileen Cardillo

Patient Coordinator
Department of Neurology
Contact: eica@mail.med.upenn.edu

As the coordinator of the Patient Database at the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, I act as a liaison between patients with brain injury, their neurologists and families, and the scientists and clinicians studying the effects of brain injury on cognition. My own research concerns embodied approaches to language and their ability to account for normal comprehension and as well as the linguistic impairments following brain injury. Using a combination of behavioral and neuroimaging tasks with healthy adults and patients, I specifically focus on the neural basis of metaphoric and spatial language. I am also interested in cognitive and neural changes associated with different types of meditation practice.
Emily Rogers

Emily Rogers

Research Specialist
Department of Neurology
Contact: rogerse@mail.med.upenn.edu

After completing my Master's degree in psychological research at the University of East Anglia in England, I became increasingly interested in the neural basis of the behavioral and cognitive processes that I had been studying from a psychological perspective. Specifically, I am interested in more socially interactive aspects of cognitive processing, such as the ways we perceive and interpret various forms of language and communication. Other than research, I enjoy yoga, drawing and rock climbing.

Post-Doctoral Fellows
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Marguerite McQuire
Ph.D.

Marguerite McQuire

Contact: mcquire@mail.med.upenn.edu

Despite the prevalence of figurative language in communication, we know little about the processes underlying its comprehension. As a graduate student at UCSD, I used electroencephalography (EEG) and behavioral methods to gain insights into literal and figurative language comprehension. Here at Penn, I hope to add to this line of study by investigating the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms using fMRI and VLSM methods with typical and patient populations. I speak fluent Spanish and French and enjoy playing wheelchair tennis.
Lorna C. Quandt
Ph.D.

Lorna Quandt

Contact: lquandt@mail.med.upenn.edu
Lorna's Website

My research primarily concerns the neural basis of spatial cognition. In my doctoral work at Temple University, I used EEG to look at how experience and perception are related. Specifically, I explored how sensorimotor experience with actions might modulate activity in the sensorimotor cortex during subsequent action observation. Going forward, I will be using functional neuroimaging techniques to investigate how action, space, and language are represented in the mind.
Anja Jamrozik
Ph.D.

Anja Jamrozik

Contact: jamrozik@mail.med.upenn.edu

My research focuses on the role of language in cognition, and the ways that language can help us guide attention, reason about abstract situations, and encode information in memory. I completed my PhD at Northwestern University, where I used behavioral methods to investigate metaphor, spatial language, and relational language. Now I plan on extending this work by using neuroimaging techniques to investigate the neural bases of metaphor and spatial language.
Ashley de Marchena
Ph.D.

Ashley de Marchena

Contact: deMarchenaA@email.chop.edu

I am a graduate of the University of Connecticut where I trained in Neuropsychology and Child Clinical Psychology. After my time at UConn, I completed my clinical training at CHOP with a focus on diagnostic assessment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from toddlers to adults. I am now a postdoc at the Center for Autism Research. I am interested in communication skills in ASD across the lifespan, including co-speech gesture, pragmatic language, and language acquisition. I am also interested in how children and adults with ASD can inform theories about typical development. The focus of my postdoctoral research project is on the relationship between atypicalities of motor development in infancy and the emergence of early social-communication skills. I am a fluent Spanish speaker and am somewhat obsessed with Spain, where I spent two years in graduate school.

Student Researchers
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Mary Dumler

Mary Dumler

Undergraduate Student

I am an undergraduate psychology student and vocalist from Loyola University New Orleans. Here at Penn, my research focus involves figurative language as it affects creative thinking. My interests include listening to and singing jazz, writing music, and making clay miniatures.
Melissa Beswick

Melissa Beswick

Undergraduate Student

I am an undergraduate at Penn majoring in the Biological Basis of Behavior. I am interested in neuroaesthetics, specifically how people with varying levels of expertise look at and evaluate different types of art. Outside of research, I enjoy writing for the BBB Society's Brainstorm blog, painting, and playing tennis.
Alex Yu

Alex Yu

Undergraduate Student

I am an undergraduate at Penn majoring in English. As an English major the brain fascinates me in how it is able to shape and mold linguistic concepts, but as a dancer I am curious as to how we are able to produce movement and beauty through intuition.
Daniel Badgio

Daniel Badgio

I graduated from St. John's College (Annapolis) where I studied the Liberal Arts by reading and discussing classic and canonical works. Currently at Penn I am taking courses and hoping to gain research experience in preparation for graduate school in neuroscience. Some of my interests that I'd like to pursue are in the domains of quantitative thinking, intuition, mathematical modelling of the brain, philosophy of neuroscience, and phenomenology.

Visiting Researchers
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Diana Rosa-Leyra

Diana Rosa-Leyra

Contact: dl.rosaleyra@gmail.com

My work in the lab focuses on the intersection of beauty and social decision-making. I'm interested in why and how aesthetic value shapes our movements and decisions. For example, we recently completed a study testing the effects of facial attractiveness on the path of our hands and eyes in an unrelated shape judgment task. I am currently a graduate student in Boston and continue my work at Penn. Outside of my research activities, I attempt to sing opera and read philosophy books. Mostly, I am a highly accomplished foodie and urban adventurer.